AccueilFAQRechercherS'enregistrerRéservé aux membresRéservé aux membresSite AARéservé aux membresRéservé aux membresConnexion

Partagez
 

 Robert Johnson

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Lafievre
Aspirant
Aspirant
Lafievre

Nombre de messages : 1704
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes maritimes
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyLun 12 Sep 2005 - 16:41

Si quelqu un connait cet homme qu il me fasse signe hello

_________________
Recrute des pilotes pour effectuer des missions d'interception de quadrimoteurs américains...
Robert Johnson 836025yv
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Lafievre
Aspirant
Aspirant
Lafievre

Nombre de messages : 1704
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes maritimes
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyMer 14 Sep 2005 - 21:58

ah
je vous colle ou quoi welcome

_________________
Recrute des pilotes pour effectuer des missions d'interception de quadrimoteurs américains...
Robert Johnson 836025yv
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Tex Hill
Colonel
Colonel
Tex Hill

Nombre de messages : 8109
Age : 62
Localisation : Cannes
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyJeu 15 Sep 2005 - 1:35

Pas d'affolement ! Y'avait des centaines de posts à lire et quelques réponses à faire. On n'est pas des boeufs !!!.... Robert Johnson 37n

Ton pilote, c'est Robert "Bob" Johnson, 28 victoires en 91 missions !!! (faut le faire !).
Il fut le 5th top ace de l'Air Force.

Il volait sur P-47 au 61st Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, 8th Air Force de fin 43 à mai 44.
A noter que le 56th Fighter Group était surnommé le "Zemke's Wolfpack", commandé par le très célèbre Colonel Hubert "Hub" Zemke (17.75 victoires).

Voici sa photo (dédicacée en plus) :
Robert Johnson Robertjohnson0po

_________________
Robert Johnson P40texhill8pefd6
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Lafievre
Aspirant
Aspirant
Lafievre

Nombre de messages : 1704
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes maritimes
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyJeu 15 Sep 2005 - 22:03

ahhhhh
merci beaucoup

_________________
Recrute des pilotes pour effectuer des missions d'interception de quadrimoteurs américains...
Robert Johnson 836025yv
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Morane Saulnier
Sergent
Sergent
Morane Saulnier

Nombre de messages : 50
Age : 59
Localisation : LA BRIE
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyJeu 15 Sep 2005 - 22:29

excellent

Et pour le même prix, on a la photo en plus !!! Robert Johnson 53
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://web.me.com/wipeout/Mod.ailes.histoires/Bienvenue.html
Tex Hill
Colonel
Colonel
Tex Hill

Nombre de messages : 8109
Age : 62
Localisation : Cannes
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyJeu 15 Sep 2005 - 23:28

............et dédicacée !.... happy

_________________
Robert Johnson P40texhill8pefd6
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Dundas
Invité
avatar


Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 0:00

Robert Johnson Rsj9ri
Robert S. Johnson survived an awful beating one day in June, 1943, when a Luftwaffe pilot shot up his helpless (but very rugged) P-47 Thunderbolt.
If that German pilot ever knew whom he hadn't killed, he surely lived to regret it. Bob Johnson would go on to score 27 aerial victories in his time with the 56th Ftr. Grp., one of the top scoring groups in the ETO, under its great leader, Col. Hub Zemke. The top two aces of the 8th AF, Johnson and Gabby Gabreski, both flew P-47s with "Zemke's Wolfpack."

Growing Up in Oklahoma
Robert S. Johnson first saw airplanes in the summer of 1928, 3 pursuit bi-planes flown by the Army Air Corps "Three Musketeers" (the barn-storming era equivalent of the Navy's Blue Angels), performing impressively wild aerobatics over Lawton, Oklahoma. His Dad had taken eight-year Bob Johnson to an air show, a big event at Post Field, attended by hundreds of people. Young Bob sat on his Dad's shoulders, watching the bi-planes cavort in sky and staring at the huge bombers with their gigantic wooden propellers.
Post Field was part of Fort Sill, an historic Army outpost; here Geronimo himself had been imprisoned and ultimately perished. In the Indian Wars of the 1840's young officers like Robert E. Lee, U.S. Grant, and W.T. Sherman had passed through Fort Sill. After the air show, Bob Johnson fell in love with flying and spent all the time he could at Post Field, learning to identify Boeing P-12 bi-planes and the low-winged P-26s, and aching for a chance to fly. But there were many other things in life for an active youngster in Lawton in those years: trying to catch the free-running Cavalry mounts, fishing for crayfish and catfish, cooking the fish over open fires on camp-outs, and hunting rabbits and squirrels with a .22. He was a Boy Scout, a member of Troop 39, a competitive boxer, and a football player.

In his autobiography, Thunderbolt!, he described the usefulness of this background to his accomplishments as a fighter pilot:

Shooting birds familiarized him with aiming a gun, compensating for bullet drop, and most importantly, the necessity for leading a moving target
Boxing, in particular one match where he came up against a formidable opponent, taught him how to overcome, or least to control and channel, his fear.
His football coach first impressed on him the simple fact that the "other guy" was probably just as scared as he was. Many times, when starting aerial combat, he thought bcak to that coach's advice, and realized that his adversaries "put their pants on one leg at a time."
From the age of eleven years, he began working after school, weekends, and summers in a woodworking shop, doing tough, heavy labor, like guiding heavy beams through a big saw. He earned $4.00 per week, which permitted him to take flying lessons in a small Taylorcraft. After high school, he started at Cameron Junior College, and promptly enrolled in the Civilian Pilot Training program, which allowed him to fly without paying for lessons. What could have been better than that?
In mid-1941, at age 21, he signed up for the Army Air Corps cadet program, and survived the excruciating indignities of the medical exam, unlike one poor fellow who was perspiring heavily. The Draconian doctor took one look at this sweaty candidate, and pronounced "You're too nervous to be a good pilot. You're excused. ... Next!"

Training: 1941-1942
Johnson began his military experience at Kelly Field in San Antonio, as a member of Class 42F. His life here, at the bottom on the military pecking order, began an ongoing hazing process, replete with "HIT A BRACE, MISTER!" and "YOU HIT A BIG ONE, MISTER!" and endless 'walking tours' where the cadets literally cleared the snow with their constant marching. After Pearl Harbor, he shipped out to Sikeston, Missouri for Primary Flight Training (I've read a lot about WWII era military pilots, and I still struggle with the terminology of their training programs: Their second assignment was called "Primary Flight Training," and their third assignment was called "Basic Flight Training," and I don't recall what the first assignment was called. But "Basic" came after "Primary." - SS) Johnson recalled that not too much changed for him and the other cadets right after Pearl Harbor. They knew they had a lot of flying to learn, and that's what they focused on.In Primary they flew the Fairchild PT-19A, a 175HP low-winged monoplane, and the flying open-cockpit Stearman PT-18, a 225 HP biplane. The hazing continued, with lots of "HIT A BRACE, MISTER!" and one memorable episode where the physically fit Johnson had to lead his classmates around in a "duckwalk," a challenging exercise where the victim had to grasp his ankles and then walk around, roughly resembling a duck. But Johnson thought the hazing was worthwhile; shortly the cadets would face real combat and have to operate as a team. Better to weed out those with weaknesses early.

At Sikeston, he learned the basic aerobatic maneuvers: the snap roll, the slow roll (which he never liked), the barrel roll, etc. He also married Barbara Morgan, his high school sweetheart towards the end of his time at Sikeston. They started their honeymoon in a bus full of Army cadets, en route to San Antonio. Here he reported to Randolph Field to begin Basic Flight Training in February 1942. Now real flying began; he learned instrument flying with the assistance of the Link trainer and several pilot instructors. He unfortunately became engaged in a battle of wills with one of his instructors, a Lt. Burgess. But before it came to a head (and, by definition, Johnson would have lost), Burgess was transferred, and replaced by Lt. Maloney, who was a great flier and a great teacher.

As the end of Basic Flight Training approached, the cadets had to indicate their choices for the next phase of training: either multi-engine (bombers) or single-engine (fighters). While his heart was in flying fighters, conversations with other cadets convinced him that his long-term interests (post-war jobs with commercial airlines) lie with multi-engine training. Thus he indicated his choices. But he was thrilled when the Air Corps ignored his specified request, and instead ordered him to report on July 19, 1942, for fighter training with the 61st Fighter Squadron of the 56th Fighter Group.

As ordered he reported to Captain Loren McCollom, the Squadron CO, and was made to feel right at home. The 61st was then based at Bridgeport, CT, but they would go up to Bradley Field temporarily to pick up the brand-new Republic P-47 Thunderbolts. Johnson spent the rest of 1942 at Bridgeport, with the 56th, learning all about and flying the massive, 2,000HP fighter, which he related in considerable detail in Thunderbolt!. The great Hub Zemke took command of the 56th FG in September of 1942, and on Thanksgiving Day, the group was ordered to be ready to ship out for Great Britain.

After interminable delays, he mad his sad good-byes to his wife Barbara, and boarded the Queen Elizabeth liner on January 6, 1943. The one-time luxury liner had been converted to a troop transport, and wsa packed with American soldiers. In a harrowing, unescorted passage, the speedy liner sailed for England, counting on her speed and unusual course to avoid the U-boats. One tragic night, the cry went up, "MAN OVERBOARD!" and someone tossed out a life preserver. But the big ship sped on.

The 56th Fighter Group arrived in mid-January, and set up shop at Kings Cliffe airfield. The pilots arrived before their planes, and occupied themselves in military and non-military activities (such as a drunken bicycle race and shooting up the barracks with a .45). But one day, they heard a loud, distinctive rumble in they sky, and they all raced to the windows, as one pilot shouted out "It's a 47!" Their aircraft had arived.

The RAF fliers helped orient them to combat in the ETO, and on one memorable day, Johnson out-maneuvered a Spitfire pilot,using the Thunderbolt's superior barrel-roll and diving capabilities to get behind the more agile Spitfire. Shortly, the Group moved over to Kings Cliffe airfield, and flew it first combat missions in mid-April, 1943
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Dundas
Invité
avatar


Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 0:07

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Dundas
Invité
avatar


Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 0:16

Thunderbolt!, by Robert S. Johnson
Johnson's autobiography, from his youth in Oklahoma, through army flying school, a lot about the start-up of the 56th Fighter Group, excellent descriptions of combat missions, including the famous one of June 26, 1943. The description of that mission alone makes this book worthwhile.

"I look the Thunderbolt over. For the first time I realize just how severe a battering the airplane has sustained. My P-47 is a flying wreck, a sieve. Let the bastard shoot! He can't hurt me any more than I've been hurt! ... I hunch my shoulders, bring my arms in close to my body, to get the full protection of the armor plate. And here I wait."


Robert Johnson Thunderbolt9fp
voila c est tout si ca peut t aider
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Lafievre
Aspirant
Aspirant
Lafievre

Nombre de messages : 1704
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes maritimes
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 18:03

merci bcp
je vais pas avoir le temps de traduidre mais c est vraiment sympa excellent

_________________
Recrute des pilotes pour effectuer des missions d'interception de quadrimoteurs américains...
Robert Johnson 836025yv
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Tex Hill
Colonel
Colonel
Tex Hill

Nombre de messages : 8109
Age : 62
Localisation : Cannes
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 20:51

J'ai commencé, mais yena long !!!
Donne moi encore 5 mn ! nodents

_________________
Robert Johnson P40texhill8pefd6
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Lafievre
Aspirant
Aspirant
Lafievre

Nombre de messages : 1704
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes maritimes
Date d'inscription : 10/09/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 22:38

wow tex
tu vas traduire!!!

_________________
Recrute des pilotes pour effectuer des missions d'interception de quadrimoteurs américains...
Robert Johnson 836025yv
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Dundas
Invité
avatar


Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyVen 16 Sep 2005 - 23:05

ouais il en est capable surtout que demain il ne travail pas lol2 et re lol2
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Tex Hill
Colonel
Colonel
Tex Hill

Nombre de messages : 8109
Age : 62
Localisation : Cannes
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyDim 18 Sep 2005 - 14:27

Après une traduction initiale, le texte a été remis en forme de façon à être plus ou moins en bon français.
Certaines expressions US, intraduisibles, ont été remplacées par des expressions françaises.
Bref, sans trop s'écarter de l'original, ce n'est plus aussi fidèle qu'une version faite par un étudiant.


Robert S. Johnson a survécu à un duel aérien particulièrement difficile, un jour de juin 1943, quand un pilote de la Luftwaffe prit pour cible son P-47 "Thunderbolt" en fâcheuse posture (mais cependant très robuste).
Si ce pilote allemand avait su qui il venait de manquer, il le regretterait encore. Bob Johnson allait remporter 27 (et non 28 ) victoires aériennes pendant son tour d'opérations avec le 56th Fighter Group, un des plus haut score de l'ETO (European Theater of Operations), sous les ordres de son charismatique leader, le Colonel Hubert Zemke. Les deux "Top Aces" de la 8th AF, "Bob" Johnson et Francis "Gabby" Gabreski (28 victoires) ont volé ensemble sur P-47 dans la même escadrille : le "Zemke's Wolfpack" (la meute de loup de Zemke).

Grandir dans l'Oklahoma
Robert S. Johnson vit pour la première fois des avions au cours de l'été 1928 : trois biplans de chasse pilotés par l'Army Air Corps, les "Trois Mousquetaires", (l'équivalent aujourd’hui des Blue Angels de la Navy ou des Thunderbirds de l'Air Force), exécuter des acrobaties aériennes sensationnelles au-dessus de Lawton, dans l'Oklahoma. Papa Johnson avait emmené son rejeton de 8 ans, Bob, assister à un meeting aérien, un événement majeur pour l'aérodrome de Post Field, qui fit la joie de centaines de spectateurs. Le jeune Bob est monté sur les épaules de son père, pour admirer les cabrioles des biplans dans le ciel et pour regarder les énormes bombardiers avec leurs gigantesques hélices en bois.
Post Field faisait partie de Fort Sill, un poste avancé au XIX ème siècle, chargé d’Histoire. C'est à cet endroit même que Géronimo, le célèbre rebelle Apache, fut emprisonné jusqu'à sa mort. Au cours des Guerres Indiennes des années 1840, de jeunes officiers comme Robert E. Lee (Chef d'état-major des armées sudistes), Ulysses S. Grant (Chef d'état-major des armées de l'Union, puis 18ème Président américain) et William .T Sherman (un des plus célèbre général de l'Union, le bras droit de Grant) passèrent quelques temps à Fort Still au cours de leur grande carrière, avant d'acquérir la célèbrité. Après ce meeting, Bob Johnson tomba amoureux des avions, et il passa tout le temps qu'il pouvait à Post Field, apprenant à identifier les biplans Boeing P-12 ainsi que nouveaux monoplans à ailes basses Boeing P-26, et guettant le moment de les voir voler. Mais il y avait également beaucoup d'autres choses à découvrir pour un jeune gamin à Lawton dans les années 30 : monter à cheval, pêcher les écrevisses et les poissons-chats, les cuire au barbecue, chasser les lapins et les écureuils avec une 22 long rifle. De plus, il était un Scout à la Troupe 39, boxeur, et joueur du football.

Dans son autobiographie, "Thunderbolt !" (19.95 $ chez http://afmuseum.com/bookstore/books/thunderbolt.html), il décrit les avantages que lui apportèrent ces activités dans ses talents de pilote de chasse :
- Le tir sur les oiseaux en vol lui a appris à viser avec une arme, à compenser la trajectoire incurvée de la balle, et le plus important, à suivre une cible en mouvement.
- La boxe, et particulièrement un match où il affronta un adversaire redoutable, lui a appris comment vaincre et comment contrôler et canaliser sa peur.
- Son entraîneur du football lui a fait tout d'abord comprendre que l' "autre type" avait probablement aussi peur que lui. Bien des fois, au début d'un combat aérien, il repensait aux conseils de son entraîneur, et il s'est rendu compte que ses adversaires, eux aussi, devaient "faire dans leur pantalon".
Dès l'âge de onze ans, il travaillait, après l'école, les week-ends et au cours des étés dans une scierie, il effectuait des travaux difficiles, comme guider de lourdes poutres sur une grande scie. Il gagnait 4 dollars par semaine, ce qui lui permit de prendre quelques leçons de pilotage sur un petit Taylorcraft. Après le lycée, il entra au Cameron Junior Collège, et s'enrôla rapidement dans un programme de formation de pilote civil, ce qui lui permis de voler gratuitement. Qu'est qui aurait pu être mieux ?
A la mi-1941, à l'âge de 21 ans, qu'il s'inscrivit au le programme des cadets de l'Army Air Corps, et il réussit à survivre aux horreurs de l'examen médical, contrairement à son pauvre copain qui transpirait à grosses gouttes. Le draconien docteur jeta un oeil sur ce candidat en sueur, et lui dit : "Vous êtes trop nerveux pour devenir un bon pilote. Vous êtes excusés. ... Suivant ! "

L'entraînement : 1941-1942
L'expérience militaire de Johnson commença à Kelly Field à San Antonio, il fit partie de la Classe 42F. A cet endroit, la vie était un processus continu de bizutage, sur fond de tatillonements purement militaires, et rempli par des "50 pompes !" ou des "200 abdo !" et par des "marches sans fin" où les cadets ont fini par dégager la neige à force de passer dessus. Après Pearl Harbor, Johnson se rendit à Sikeston, dans le Missouri pour effectuer son "Primary Flight Training" (j'ai lu beaucoup de choses à propos des pilotes de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, et je suis toujours en froid avec la terminologie des programmes de formation : le deuxième programme est appelé le vol "Primary Flight Training", et le troisième programme est désigné le vol "Basic Flight Training", et je ne me rappelle pas comment se nommait le premier programme. Mais "Basic" vient après "Primary"). Pour Johnson et les autres cadets, Pearl Harbor ne bouleversa pas les choses. Ils savaient qu'ils devaient encore voler beaucoup pour devenir de bons pilotes, et c'est ce qu'ils firent au "Primary Flight Training" en pilotant des Fairchild PT-19A, des monoplans à ailes basses de 175 ch, et des Stearman PT-18, un biplan de 225 ch avec un cockpit ouvert en vol. Le bizutage s'est poursuivi avec beaucoup de "50 pompes, Monsieur !" et avec un épisode mémorable où Johnson, qui était un costaud, devait conduire ses camarades de classe dans un "duckwalk", un exercice difficile où le "volontaire" devait se promener en se tenant les chevilles, ressemblant ainsi à un canard. Mais Johnson pensait que le bizutage en valait la peine ; bientôt les cadets seraient confrontés à de vrais combats et devraient opérer en équipe. Mieux valait écarter au plus tôt ceux qui présentaient des faiblesses.

À Sikeston, il apprit les manoeuvres aériennes de base : le tonneau déclenché, le tonneau lent (qu'il n'a jamais aimé), le tonneau barriqué, etc... Vers la fin de sa période à Sikeston, Il se maria avec Barbara Morgan, son "coeur en sucre" depuis le lycée. Ils commencèrent leur lune de miel dans un autobus, rempli de cadets de l'Armée, en route pour San Antonio (Ndt : Robert Johnson 07 !!! ). Une fois arrivé à destination, il commença sa période "Basic Flight Training" en février 1942. Maintenant le vrai vol commençait ; il apprit à voler aux instruments avec l'assistance d'un simulateur et de plusieurs instructeurs. Il entra malheureusement en conflit avec un de ses instructeurs, le Lieutnant Burgess. Mais avant d'en être arrivé à un point irréversible, (que Johnson aurait perdu à coup sûr), Burgess fut transféré, et fut remplacé par le Lieutnant Maloney qui était un grand pilote et un grand instructeur.

Comme la fin de la période "Basic Flight Training" approchait, les cadets devaient se prononcer sur leurs choix avant d'entamer la prochaine phase de leur formation : soit les multi-moteurs (bombardiers) ou les monomoteurs (chasseurs). Bien que son coeur penchait pour l'aviation de chasse, ses conversations avec les autres cadets le convainquirent que ses intérêts à long terme (trouver un job, après la guerre, comme pilote sur des lignes aériennes commerciales) se trouvaient dans une formation sur multi-moteurs. Ainsi, il indiqua ce choix. Mais il fut très surpris d'apprendre que l'Air Corps ait ignoré ses préférences, et qu'elle lui ait ordonné de se présenter le 19 juillet 1942, au 61st Fighter Squadron du 56th Fighter Group, pour effectuer son entraînement sur chasseur.

Comme il lui avait été ordonné, il se présenta au Captain Loren McCollom, le commandant du Squadron, et il se sentit aussi bien que chez lui. Le 61st FS était alors basé à Bridgeport dans le Connecticut, mais ils devaient se rendre provisoirement à Bradley Field pour prendre livraison de leur tout nouveau Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. Johnson passa le reste de l'année 1942 à Bridgeport, avec le 56th FG, à apprendre à voler aux commandes de l'imposant chasseur de 2000 ch. Cet épisode est raconté dans le détail dans "Thunderbolt !". Le grand Hub Zemke prit le commandement du 56th FG en septembre de 1942 et, le jour de Thanksgiving, le groupe reçut l'ordre de se tenir prêt à partir pour la Grande-Bretagne.

Après une attente interminable, plein de tristesse, il dit au revoir à sa femme Barbara, et monta à bord du paquebot Queen Elizabeth le 6 janvier 1943. Le luxueux paquebot d'avant-guerre avait été converti en transport de troupes, et il était rempli de soldats américains. Pendant cette dangereuse traversée, sans escorte, le rapide paquebot voguait vers l'Angleterre, comptant sur sa grande vitesse et sur sa route inhabituelle pour éviter les sous-marins de Donitz. Au cours d'une nuit tragique, un cri traversa l'obscurité : "Un homme à la mer ! "; quelqu'un jeta une bouée... Mais le grand navire continua sa route.

Le 56th FG arriva en Angleterre à la mi-janvier, et il s'installa sur le terrain de Kings Cliffe. Les pilotes arrivèrent avant leurs avions et, pour combler l'attente, ils se livrèrent à des activités plus ou moins militaires (comme faire des courses de vélo tout en étant ivres ou tirer des coups de 45 dans les baraquements). Mais un jour, ils entendirent un grondement très bruyant dans le ciel, ils coururent tous aux fenêtres, lorsqu'un pilote hurla "c'est un P-47 !". Leurs avions étaient arrivés.

Les pilotes de la RAF les aidèrent à s'orienter et à se battre sur l'ETO et, lors d'une journée mémorable, Johnson simula un combat avec un pilote de Spitfire, les capacités du Thunderbolt lors des tonneaux barriqués et sa supériorité en piqué lui permit de se maintenir derrière le Spitfire pourtant plus agile. Rapidement, le 56th FG commença ses premières missions de combat à la mi-avril 1943.
Robert Johnson Finalmission9qp

_________________
Robert Johnson P40texhill8pefd6
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
le belge
Major
Major
le belge

Nombre de messages : 775
Localisation : 72
Date d'inscription : 07/06/2005

Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson EmptyDim 23 Oct 2005 - 22:10

le pilote en question qui laissa filer Johnson était l'as Egon Mayer, alors
commandant de la Jagdgeschwader 2 " Richthofen" (du 01.07.1943 au 02.03.1944) et basé à Cormeilles-en-Vexin.
(de memoire il a abattu 3 b24 en une sortie mais abattu le 2 mars 1944 par un ........p47 alors qu'il avait 102 victoire, a du aller coir les russes)
revenons a Johnson: première victoire en désobeissant aux ordres ( car était affecté a la protection de bombardier)
ayant acquis de l'experience, il avait un conseil pour les attaques venant d'en haut :" si un boche descend droit sur vous, remontez ds sa direction et, 9 fois sur 10, si vous etes presque en situation de le heurter de plein fouet, il s'écartera par la droite. Alors poursuivez le et abattez le! "
bon voila ce que je sais sur cet as
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




Robert Johnson Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Robert Johnson   Robert Johnson Empty

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Robert Johnson
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» La Robert Mintkewicz
» les Sacs au Master 2012
» Stage avec Robert PATUREL à Strasbourg
» Al Pacino ou Robert De Niro
» Robert Lilomaiava

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Aviation Ancienne :: Histoire de l'Aviation par thèmes :: Pilotes :: Les grands As-
Sauter vers: